What Does It Cost To Hire A Social Security Disability Lawyer?

If you’re facing health problems that stop you from working, it’s understandable to worry about finances.

Without income from a job, uncertainty clouds your ability to support your family, put food on the table, keep your house and your car.

The last thing you think you can afford is hiring a lawyer.

But applying for Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits with help from an experienced attorney could be your path to winning crucial financial relief.

Here’s some much-needed good news: Social Security Administration (SSA) rules ensure you don’t have to pay any legal fees out of your pocket.

PAYING FOR PROFESSIONAL REPRESENTATION

Social Security Disability law is different from many other areas of the law in the way attorneys are compensated.

The SSA rules provide that lawyers or other SSD representatives only get paid when applicants win their benefits claims.

When you do win your claim, your representative is paid from past-due benefits – money you should have been receiving from the date your official disability began – so it doesn’t come from your bank account.

And even then, the law limits the amount attorneys can receive from those past-due benefits.

The cap is 25% of your past-due benefits for certain services. Other situations require SSA approval.

At Levine Benjamin, we believe this system respects the circumstances of people who need help because of a disability. It eases the process for you and removes financial risk if you are denied benefits.

So when you work with an SSD lawyer from Levine Benjamin, you don’t pay anything up front and never pay anything out of pocket.

In fact, if you aren’t successful getting benefits from the SSA, you won’t pay anything at all.

THE SSD BENEFITS APPLICATION PROCESS

Then there’s the question of why you might need a lawyer or other representative to begin with.

In order to obtain benefits, you must provide medical evidence showing your physical or mental condition makes it impossible for you to work.

That often means showing you can’t do your current job or any other job your training and skills qualify you for.

In addition, your medical record must show you’re expected to be unable to work for at least one full year because of your medical condition.

If you think you might qualify for SSD, you’ll need to complete a detailed initial questionnaire.

If you don’t have all of your medical records, you can still apply and sign a form authorizing the SSA to get copies of your records directly from your doctors and other providers.

The application also asks about all of the jobs you’ve held over the past 15 years.

And it asks how the symptoms of your condition affect your ability to handle everyday tasks at home.

The SSA will review all of this information and make an initial determination, either approving your claim or denying it.

Qualifying for benefits isn’t easy. Most people are denied on the first try and need to appeal.

In many cases, applicants succeed when they appeal their case to an administrative law judge.

The need for support as you go through a complicated process is a major reason why you might want to work with a professional.

Improving your chances of success is another reason.

Statistically speaking, claimants who have professional representation stand a better chance of winning approval.

CONTACT LEVINE BENJAMIN TODAY

The experienced SSD benefits attorneys at Levine Benjamin understand Social Security Disability qualifications requirements.

We’ve been helping people just like you win benefits since 1964.

We can help you submit full and complete information to substantiate your benefits claim, giving you a better chance of winning benefits.

If your physical or mental condition is keeping you from working and you want to explore whether you qualify for SSD, apply with help from an attorney at Levine Benjamin.

Contact us today to schedule a free initial consultation.

Remember that you won’t pay anything out of pocket. And you only pay if we’re successful in helping you win benefits.

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